The Story Place

Creative and interpretive displays in the Story Place vividly illustrate Kojonup’s history, immersing the viewer in the culture of Kojonup, and powerfully showing the harsh realities of life for both Noongar and Wadjela people living and working together during the last century.

The dominance of agriculture and the importance of meat and wool in the region is illustrated by the display of over a million ear tags - reminding the visitor that the Shire was the first in Australia to have a sheep population of more than a million.

Consider the continuous life-threatening danger of fire for rural communities as anecdotes of the local Bushfire Brigade make the heat, the flames and the exhaustion perilously real.

Learn about farming history in Kojonup


The shearing shed explores the employment opportunities that come with the sheep industry in rural Australia, and demonstrates how shearing – a cornerstone of bush life - is done.

Learn some of the fencing knots and techniques, developed in the years when the land was changed forever to accommodate farming. Learn of the inventiveness and resourcefulness of local people, the ingenuity that results from living far from a hardware shop, and the impact of technological innovations as signified by that most Australian Invention - the ute.

Discover Kojonup's Aboriginal history


Acknowledge the harsh laws and regulations that governed the lives of Noongar people as you study the precious documents displayed on the Acknowledgement Wall; the battles for citizenship and the struggles that came with the policies surrounding the forced removal of their children.

Appreciate the spirit that survived even within the sparseness of the Reserve Hut, built to typify the quarters in which many people lived under strict regulations until as late as 1971.

Kids will love the interactive school bus, perhaps the only one in existence with its own periscope, while parents can debate the truth of yarns and tales spun by locals over a beer at the Spring Bar.

And the dramatic Fire Sculpture shows the significance of fire to the different groups - important to the Noongar people’s beliefs and customs, the regeneration of the bush and dangerous and threatening to the farmers.


More information


If you would like to know more about Kojonup, visit:

Kojonup Visitor Centre
Address: 143 Albany Highway Kojonup WA 6395
Phone: +61 8 9831 0500
Fax: +61 8 9831 0300
Email: kojonupvisitors@bigpond.com

Or use the Contact Us form on this site.
  • Hear Aboriginal stories, at the Story Place in KojonupHear Aboriginal stories, at the Story Place in Kojonup
  • The Story Place, KojonupThe Story Place, Kojonup